‘Good Trouble around Asia Minor’: a sermon on Acts 18

Getting into good trouble by welcoming outsiders is the only faithful response to exclusion. That’s my argument in this sermon, continuing the theme of the previous sermon by using John Lewis’ beautiful phrase.

Writing about my Acts 17 sermon, which took place the week before this one, I admitted I wasn’t as bold as I should have been confronting the evils of our country’s current policy of separating families of immigrants and refugees, lying to those families about when they will be able to see each other, and putting the children in cages. I also vowed to do better.

Did I succeed in that goal? Ultimately, that is up to you, dear reader/listener, to discern. I think I so. In fact, I think this is pretty strong. One of my better sermons. But, as they say, your mileage may vary.

What do you think?

Chapter 18 features Paul doing a ton of traveling. So yet another map helps me visualize where all he different places the action takes us: Athens, Corinth, Ephesus, Caesarea, Jerusalem, Antioch, Galatia, and Phrygia.

Paul's 2nd journey full map

 

Three other visual aids made their way into this sermon:

Apparently I say this with some frequency. 

 

The “Kind is cool” bracelet that could not carry the weight of our current presidential administration’s meanness.

Turns out this got thrown away so I can’t show you a picture of it. You’ll just have to imagine it as I toss it away into the first pew during that part of the sermon.

 

The comeback kid

 

Here’s the sermon

Oh, did you catch the subtle reference to an ’80s cult movie classic? (It is, I admit, quite the reach.)

Other sermons in this series on Acts: Chapter 9, Chapter 10, Chapter 11, Chapter 12, Chapter 13, Chapter 17.

‘Good Trouble?’: a sermon on Acts 17

In June, 2008, I had the distinct pleasure of hearing Representative John Lewis speak at a Sojourners conference in D.C. He is, it should go without saying, a real-life hero. A national treasure. An inspiration.

Except, I’m ashamed to admit, at the time I didn’t really know just how special he was, and thus I did not know just how special was the opportunity to hear him in person.

I was 36 years old at the time of that conference. I’ve lived my whole life in the United States. I was educated in good schools, both public and private, from elementary school through graduate school at seminary. I’ve been active in church my whole life. And yet, somehow, in the summer of 2008 I did not know who John Lewis was or why he is so important to the story of our country.

I have of course rectified that now. But, damn, it’s embarrassing it took me so long. Lewis recently published the story of his life in a three-part graphic novel called March. It is phenomenal. You should go read it now. Seriously. Right now. The sermon at the end of this post will still be right here waiting for you.

All of that John Lewis talk was set up for the next sermon in our ongoing series on Acts of the Apostles, the title for which I stole was inspired by Lewis’ oft-used phrase, “get into good trouble.

This time we’ve skipped ahead to Acts chapter 17 where we find those early followers of Jesus getting into good trouble. My thesis here is that we contemporary followers of Jesus need to get into some good trouble by speaking out about injustice — especially the horrifying injustice of the current president and his administration separating families seeking refuge in our country. I also spend some time refuting the “don’t be political” canard. Faith in the God of Moses, Esther, and Jesus (just to name a few) is inherently political.

Still, after the fact I was confronted with the reality that I wasn’t nearly as bold in this sermon as I intended to be. So I sought to correct that in the follow up sermon…check back here soon for that.

Listen to the sermon series a chapter at a time: Acts 9, Acts 10, Acts 11, Acts 12, Acts 13

Here are the maps I used during this sermon:

Paul's full 2nd journey map for July 15, 2018

Pauls 2nd journey map for July 15, 2018

Finally, here’s the sermon audio. What stands out for you?

 

 

 

‘The First Dream Team’: a sermon on Acts 13

According to (what we’ve designated as) the 13th chapter of Acts of the Apostles, the leaders of the Way were diverse from the very beginning. Apparently, I hadn’t previously read this part of Acts closely enough, because that revelation kind of shocked me.

Those leaders weren’t afraid to boldly confront evil, which can be inspiring. But there was also plenty of interpersonal drama, which can also be inspiring…though that sounds a bit strange, I admit. People gonna people, no matter the year or culture.  Clearly the early church, which we moderns too often romanticize or idolize, had plenty of problems — just like we do today. That’s been one of the lessons of this sermon series on Acts: most of the problems the church faces today are not new. They’ve been with us since the beginning, in one form or another.

Once again, I find Steve Thomason’s depiction of this section of Acts very compelling:

Acts 13 steve thomason art

 

I am not a geography genius. Throughout this sermon series, I’ve shared a number of maps in order to help me have a sense of where the action described takes place. I know it enriches my visualization of the story. Perhaps it does for you too. Here’s the one I used  in this sermon:

Map of Paul's First Journey

 

Check out other sermons in this series: Chapter 9, Chapter 10, Chapter 11, Chapter 12

Here’s the audio for “The First Dream Team,” originally delivered June 10, 2018:

 

 

 

 

‘Delightfully Stranger Things’: a sermon on Acts 12

Now that I have my sermons in a more easily-uploadable format (Thanks, Reid!), I figured they would become regular content here.

[checks date on most recent post]

Oops. Clearly, it is sermon time again.

We’re in the midst of a series on Acts of the Apostles. We’re basically looking at one chapter per week. Below are my thoughts on Acts 12. Again, I don’t print my sermons here because I think they are auditory events and as such need to be heard if they are to be fully experienced after the fact. Also, I generally don’t have a full manuscript to post. So there’s that.

Follow the series on Acts: Chapter 9Chapter 10, Chapter 11

My thesis for Acts chapter 12 is that this story reminds us that the Kin-dom of God is a place where all, even and especially “Outsiders” belong. That needs to be true of the church too, if it is to be faithful to the Way of Jesus.

At least that is what I was trying to say. Let me know what you hear.

 

 

Busting Taboos, part 2: Sermons on Acts 10 & 11

I don’t always get to preach two weeks in a row, so when I do I try to connect them, to make them into a mini-series at least. This time however, we are doing a series on the book of The Acts of the Apostles. So the sermon I’m posting here from May 13th (Mother’s Day) on Acts chapter 11 follows naturally from this sermon on Acts 10. Or at least I intended for them to flow together naturally. Ultimately, whether or not I succeeded in that is up to, dear reader, to decide.

No added visuals this time. But this sermon is longer because it includes my conversion story (as promised in the previous sermon).

Here’s what I attempted to say: “Listening to God’s Spirit changed the church. Excluding LGBT is ruining UMC’s reputation. Listening to LGBT Christians changed me, and could our church too.” Let me know what you heard though.

 

Busting Taboos: Sermons on Acts 10 & 11

The sermon series on Acts of the Apostles (which I first wrote about here) continues. I preached on May 6th and May 13th on chapters 10 and 11, respectively. Many others have said this many times, but the story told in Acts 10 & 11 is the most significant story the church has. As I argued a few years ago, Acts 10:35 should be our “leadoff hitter, our first responder, our top go-to text”:

God has just shown me that I should no longer consider any human being unclean or profane… God accepts every person regardless of background or culture. God welcomes all who revere Him and do right.

How much better would Christianity be if that was our main mantra?

As I keep reiterating, sermons need to be heard not just read. So here’s “The Best Worst Buffet” on Acts 10 from May 6, 2018. Visuals I used are below the audio.

My intended thesis was, “God seeks to subvert our penchant for exclusivity.” Let me know what you hear though.

 

Acts as Tree image

 

Acts 10 map

 

This seems long enough; I’ll give the May 13th sermon it’s own post.

UPDATE: May 13th sermon on Acts 11 here.

“What’s Next?” April 15, 2018 sermon

While my job title is not Associate Pastor, that’s what it would be in most church settings. Someone else is the Lead Pastor (she’s awesome, by the way!). My responsibilities include  youth ministry as well as our justice and outreach ministries. As you might expect, I help lead our two Sunday worship services. But what is apparently a little odd about my situation (ok, one of the odd things) is that I get to preach regularly. Usually once per month, though occasionally more than that. I enjoy preaching. It is challenging and daunting and fun.

Yet, you won’t find many sermons here on my blog. I’ve written about this a few times before. I generally don’t preach from a manuscript, so I don’t have full text to post so that you could read my sermon. More importantly than that, however, is that I find sermons to be nearly exclusively auditory events. They need to be heard to be fully experienced. But most weeks, it is a CD that I have and the technical wherewithal to make a post with audio recording of the sermon that I lack. I can be kind of a dope.

However, recently, an incredible member of our congregation offered to take on the technological part of the task! (H/T to Reid and Kevin!) Thus, I intend to be much better at sharing that content here. Forewarned is fair-warned?

This past Sunday — April 15th — was week 2 of a series on the book of Acts. Our text was Acts 9:1-31. My thesis: The story of the early church has much to teach us. Acts continues the story of God calling and using unlikely people. People such as you and me and us.

At least that was the thesis in my head. I’d love to know what you heard.

I used some visual aids during the sermon. Seeing those will (should?) make the audio make more sense. Those are below.

Special thanks to pastor and illustrator Steve Thomason for sharing his amazing art with the Narrative Lectionary group and, you know, the world.

On to the sermon…

 

 

First, the book of Acts of the Apostles offered in the visual metaphor of a tree.

 

Next, two maps of the areas mentioned in the text for the week. An overview of the Roman Empire, allowing us to see Saul’s hometown of Tarsus. Then a closer look at the sections of Israel: Judea, Samaria, Galilee, and the road to Damascus.

Roman Empire of New Testament

 

 

Jerusalem to damascus map

 

 

Finally, my favorite: Thomason’s visual of the story of Acts chapters 8-9, that is also set up (loosely) as a map. So many intriguing stories here!

Acts Chap 8-9 illustration

 

The best note

UPDATE: Here’s the audio of the sermon that elicited this response that moved me so.

I was trying to say: Resurrection confirms God’s dream for this world. Resurrection invites us to bring God’s dream to life. What did you hear though?

 

I talk. A lot. It’s kinda my gig as a pastor. There are plenty of days when I wonder if all the words I say — all the prayers, all the songs, all the sermons — matter to anyone at all. Am I, are we as a church, making a difference in anyone’s life with all our unending words?

It seems that, for this week at least, the answer is yes. I hope you’ll forgive me as this is insanely self-serving, but this week we received this note regarding worship Easter morning:

As a first time visitor, I was struck by the all-inclusive atmosphere – on so many levels, including having children actively participating. This was in clear reflection of Pastor Dave’s sermon about not only being all-inclusive and welcoming, but to listening to people. his mention of what was and was not factual or reported in the Gospels struck a chord as well. This sermon and visit has given me rebirth in the belief that there are still many Christians who really reflect on what it means to be a Christian and to act thusly. Thank you.

Affirmation is so powerful. And humbling. And inspiring.

I hope we can continue to live up to what this person saw in us. I know it is that for which we are striving.

Ash Wednesday reflections

Three teenagers and one pre-teen helped make our Ash Wednesday worship gathering happen. One served as sound board apprentice, the other three led prayers or scripture readings. Having young people eager to participate in worship always makes my heart glad.

Glad hearts were in short supply this Wednesday.  Too much death. Always and forever, too much death. Yet, acknowledging our mortality is a key component of Ash Wednesday.  As is, at least at Woodridge United Methodist, a time of extended silent prayer. That fills my soul more than just about anything.

Our sequence this week:

-Singing “Come and Fill Our Hearts”

-8 minutes of silence

-This beautiful song by Over the Rhine

 

-My brief reflection:

Part of our job tonight is to remind ourselves of our inescapable mortality. Tragically, we have been reminded of that all too well today. A recent diagnosis of cancer, community members entering hospice care, and the mass shooting in a Florida high school.

So, yes, we have much for which we need to repent: the way we allow rampant gun violence; poverty; scapegoating of immigrants, and so much more.

Yet…I am convinced God’s favorite people are broken.

I am convinced we are not alone.

I am convinced we belong right here.

-Imposition of ashes

-Going out on this song by Gungor:

 

What was your Ash Wednesday experience?

 

Working Again

Welcome Back
I work with truly wonderful people.

 

Thanks to Becky, our amazing Office Manager, that lovely greeting was waiting for me when I walked into my office today. My spiritual renewal is over so, for the first time in four months, I was back at work.*

As recently as, oh I don’t know, yesterday, I wasn’t so sure I was ready to be back. Being off — especially on Sundays — was really enjoyable. Then I stepped up to the church building, keys at the ready to unlock the door…but I didn’t even need them. Becky could see me; she buzzed me in. We chatted briefly; I went down the hall to my office. And I discovered I was glad to be back. I wanted to be there. I might have even smiled to myself.

Don’t get me wrong: there was no basking in a holy glow, nor a sounding of the heavenly chorus. I didn’t feel my heart strangely warmed. But being in that physical space again felt right. Maybe there is a deeper meaning to be found in that welcome, in having a door opened for me?

Whatever the reasons, I discovered, somewhat to my surprise, I am ready to work.

Certainly, there is much to be done in our country and our world as the compassionate, loving, justice-seeking hands, feet, and voice of Jesus. Let’s get to it.

 

*There are, I know, layers of privilege in that sentence (and this whole post). I intend to examine those layers soon.